Improving the handling of a QA tool

Improving the handling of a QA tool

How to help users get to grips with a QA tool?

Overview

Context: Context: HorusTest is a no-code tool for performing functional web. When users tried out the product for the first time, they struggled using it. Indeed, most of them did not complete the onboarding process, and failed to create their first automated functional test.

Stakeholders: Founder, developer and product designer

Process

Step 1: Understanding the context

To get started, I became familiar with the world of functional testing. In particular, I needed to know:

  • What are functional tests

  • What are these tests used for

  • Who usually performs these tests


Step 2: Current onboarding audit

I then put myself in the shoes of a user not familiar with the solution. At each stage, I wrote down my comments, the points I wanted to keep and those I felt needed to be reworked.

This analysis highlighted friction points that partially explained the loss of users along the way. For example, users were asked to install a plugin during the onboarding process. This plugin was not mentioned on the website or in the previous steps. As a result, some users gave up due to a lack of context and information.


Step 3: Onboarding revamp

To rework the onboarding process, we asked ourselves the following question:

What's the easiest way to get users to create their first automated test?

To make things clearer, turned this question into a simple user flow:

We made sure to answer these questions:

  • What do users need to do to move on to the next stage?

  • What do they need to know?

  • What's the easiest way to do so?


Step 4: benchmark + ideation

I did a benchmark of other tools, then prioritized the actions we needed to take:

  • Explain the need to install the plugin from the outset

  • Gamify the onboarding with key steps and levels to unlock

  • Use tooltips to explain each step and provide context


Step 5: onboarding revamp

I turned the previous work to low-fidelity wireframes. For once, I used Whimsical to save time. Note that at this stage, content is still drafted. The idea is to map what information users need and when they need it.


Once we validated the new onboarding flow, I finalized editing the content in the prototype.


Final thoughts

I enjoyed working on this project, mainly because I had to learn a lot about functional testing methods. We had to be creative enough to gamify the onboarding, and find the most appropriate tone of voice. Indeed, it was particularly challenging to balance extreme simplification and expert vocabulary.

However, I had to deal with certain limitations, including the lack of time and technical restrictions. I wish I could have tested the content with users.

Overview

Context: Context: HorusTest is a no-code tool for performing functional web. When users tried out the product for the first time, they struggled using it. Indeed, most of them did not complete the onboarding process, and failed to create their first automated functional test.

Stakeholders: Founder, developer and product designer

Process

Step 1: Understanding the context

To get started, I became familiar with the world of functional testing. In particular, I needed to know:

  • What are functional tests

  • What are these tests used for

  • Who usually performs these tests


Step 2: Current onboarding audit

I then put myself in the shoes of a user not familiar with the solution. At each stage, I wrote down my comments, the points I wanted to keep and those I felt needed to be reworked.

This analysis highlighted friction points that partially explained the loss of users along the way. For example, users were asked to install a plugin during the onboarding process. This plugin was not mentioned on the website or in the previous steps. As a result, some users gave up due to a lack of context and information.


Step 3: Onboarding revamp

To rework the onboarding process, we asked ourselves the following question:

What's the easiest way to get users to create their first automated test?

To make things clearer, turned this question into a simple user flow:

We made sure to answer these questions:

  • What do users need to do to move on to the next stage?

  • What do they need to know?

  • What's the easiest way to do so?


Step 4: benchmark + ideation

I did a benchmark of other tools, then prioritized the actions we needed to take:

  • Explain the need to install the plugin from the outset

  • Gamify the onboarding with key steps and levels to unlock

  • Use tooltips to explain each step and provide context


Step 5: onboarding revamp

I turned the previous work to low-fidelity wireframes. For once, I used Whimsical to save time. Note that at this stage, content is still drafted. The idea is to map what information users need and when they need it.


Once we validated the new onboarding flow, I finalized editing the content in the prototype.


Final thoughts

I enjoyed working on this project, mainly because I had to learn a lot about functional testing methods. We had to be creative enough to gamify the onboarding, and find the most appropriate tone of voice. Indeed, it was particularly challenging to balance extreme simplification and expert vocabulary.

However, I had to deal with certain limitations, including the lack of time and technical restrictions. I wish I could have tested the content with users.

‍© Justine Sudraud – All rights reserved - 2024

‍© Justine Sudraud

All rights reserved - 2023